On an urban campus, parking places are at a premium so when the human resources department allocated five slots to the student life office, they thought the staff members would be elated. They were – until they learned that the spots had to be vacated by 5pm and were available only Monday through Friday. Since most of the office’s work occurs in the evenings and weekends, that perk suddenly lost its luster.

I’ve heard several tales lately of HR offices being out of touch with the work of others in their own organization. At one school, performance evaluations were scheduled to be due in August – usually the busiest month of the year in preparation for opening. Why would they make such a time-consuming task due at the same time? On another campus, administrators were verbally promoting employee engagement and interaction with students but withdrew the staff meal benefits that encouraged this practice.

It’s not just HR that becomes isolated. The pace of work, doing most work remotely, and the budget cuts that have added to the workloads of the remaining staff – all are contributing factors to people worried more about getting their work done instead of taking the time to develop relationships and understanding with others. Don’t let it happen to you.

Everything you do has an impact on someone else, either inside or outside of your organization. Your work will have more meaning – and likely more effectiveness – if you know those who benefit from your services. Make the time to ask before you act.

 

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