I watched a presentation by Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to Be Antiracist. He fit the profile of dot 2960 of someone who is used to working behind the scenes and now is thrust into the spotlight. He spoke of how he used to spend all of his time in the archives and behind a computer, not behind a camera and microphone.

Kendi has become an in-demand speaker due to the topic and timing of his book, and he certainly has many ideas to offer on the subject. But something that also stuck with me was the comment he made about how while he was writing this piece, he was diagnosed with Stage 4 Colon Cancer, a diagnosis that only has a 12% survival rate. He said that he decided then that since he may not even live to see the book published, he may as well put it all out there. In the end, not only did he live, but his vulnerability gave power to the book and landed him a Number One spot on the New York Times Best Seller List.

 As Tim McGraw’s lyrics remind us, “Live Like You Were Dying.” You don’t need a health scare to put your best self forward. Your words may not please everyone, but they could also change lives.

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

I'm the chief connector at leadership dots where I serve as "the string" for individuals and organizations. Like stringing pearls together to make a necklace, "being the string" is an intentional way of thinking and behaving – making linkages between things that otherwise appear random or unconnected – whether that be supervising a staff, completing a dissertation or advancing a project in the workplace. I share daily leadership dots on my blog to provide examples of “the string” in action. I use the string philosophy through coaching, consulting and teaching to help others build capacity in themselves and their organizations. I craft analogies and metaphors that help people comprehend complex topics and understand their role in the system. My favorite work involves helping those new to supervision or newly promoted supervisors build confidence and learn the skills necessary to effectively lead their team.

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