How do you command a premium price for an ordinary product? One way is through packaging. The Welly Company has done just that with a new line of bandages that come in colorful containers labeled with clever names.

There is a whole series of colorful first-aid items: Bumper Stickers (for knee and elbow injuries), Blister Blasters (for fingers and toes) and Kicker Stickers (that protect from heel rubs). Creams are called Bravery Balm and Calm Balm (to relieve itching). Other supplies include Comfy Covers, Oops Equipment, a Human Repair Kit and Dressings for Distress.

The items cost about twice what the standard first aid supplies do, but it may be worth it to parents. Instead of begging a child to tend to their wound, it would be a lot more enticing for him to wear a Bravery Badge, to utilize Superhero Supplies or to select a Handie Bandie from the polka dotted box.

A rose by any other name may still be a rose, but a boo-boo salved with Bravery Balm and Hero Tape is designed to provide quicker relief than Neosporin and a bandage. How can you repackage the ordinary and make it “all better” for your organization?

 

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

I'm the chief connector at leadership dots where I serve as "the string" for individuals and organizations. Like stringing pearls together to make a necklace, "being the string" is an intentional way of thinking and behaving – making linkages between things that otherwise appear random or unconnected – whether that be supervising a staff, completing a dissertation or advancing a project in the workplace. I share daily leadership dots on my blog to provide examples of “the string” in action. I use the string philosophy through coaching, consulting and teaching to help others build capacity in themselves and their organizations. I craft analogies and metaphors that help people comprehend complex topics and understand their role in the system. My favorite work involves helping those new to supervision or newly promoted supervisors build confidence and learn the skills necessary to effectively lead their team.

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