Last week my sister — who lives in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts – received a postcard that was mailed from Colorado in October. Apparently, it went on a little Caribbean holiday en route to her as it was stamped: “Missent to Jamaica”.

I can understand a bit of confusion every now and then, but apparently, it happens frequently enough for the Post Office to have A RUBBER STAMP that says that. Aye!

If you have a flaw in your system that happens so often that you have a stamp or process to adjust for the mistake, perhaps you are better off spending the resources to fix the problem instead. Marking something as “missent” does not atone for the three-month delay in arrival or do anything except to highlight the inefficiency of your service.

Adopt some of the pace of the Jamaican culture and slow down a bit – and avoid the client-aggravating detour that rushing can cause.

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

I'm the chief connector at leadership dots where I serve as "the string" for individuals and organizations. Like stringing pearls together to make a necklace, "being the string" is an intentional way of thinking and behaving – making linkages between things that otherwise appear random or unconnected – whether that be supervising a staff, completing a dissertation or advancing a project in the workplace. I share daily leadership dots on my blog to provide examples of “the string” in action. I use the string philosophy through coaching, consulting and teaching to help others build capacity in themselves and their organizations. I craft analogies and metaphors that help people comprehend complex topics and understand their role in the system. My favorite work involves helping those new to supervision or newly promoted supervisors build confidence and learn the skills necessary to effectively lead their team.

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