In yesterday’s dot, I wrote about the ISMs that define the culture at Quicken Loans. While researching that topic, I came across another organization that intentionally shapes its culture through its orientation and widespread understanding of company norms. (A slide share describing Netflix’s culture is here.)

Netflix outlines typical behaviors and skills that it values — including judgment, communication, curiosity, passion and honesty — but they take it a step further in how they infuse these values into hiring and promotion practices.

Netflix’s model “endeavors to have only outstanding employees.” This combination of high performers and good managerial context allows the company to increase employee freedom and “grow with ever more high performing people, not with rules.”

An example of this freedom is seen in the vacation policy, or, more accurately, the lack of one. There is no policy for vacation or tracking, but as Netflix points out, “there is also no clothing policy but no one comes to work naked.”

The policy for expense reports: “Act in Netflix’s best interest.” Period. That is the entire policy.

Netflix invests heavily in hiring and retaining people who fit within its culture of freedom and responsibility, and who have demonstrated the self-discipline it takes for both the employees and the company to succeed. It is model that works for them because of its intentionality, integration and pervasiveness.

What you can learn from Quicken Loans and Netflix about the power of values to shape the work environment, and how can you make your values actively drive your behavior?

beth triplett
@leadershipdots

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

Dr. beth triplett is the owner of leadership dots, offering coaching, training and consulting for new supervisors. She also shares daily lessons on her leadershipdots blog. Her work is based on the leadership dots philosophy that change happens through the intentional connecting of small steps in the short term to the big picture in the long term.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s