On Tuesday morning, I emailed my veterinarian’s office with a question about my dog. I found it much easier to type out a few sentences about an on-going issue rather than to explain it from scratch to their receptionist, so I was happy to use the email they list on their materials.

As soon as I sent it, I received an auto-reply:  “We have received your email and will respond if appropriate during our regular business hours of XX.”  Great.

On Wednesday afternoon, I still had not heard back so I called them.  Literally, the receptionist said: “We’re not the best at checking email.”  What?  Even if you aren’t, shouldn’t the first words out of your mouth be “I’m sorry.”

I adore my vet. The office: not so much.  If I didn’t love, love, love my vet, the office would have annoyed me into finding a new provider long ago.

Never underestimate the power held by the person who answers your phone.  Your brand is delivered by them every single time they pick up the line.  Are the words coming across the line tarnishing or polishing your image?

— beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

I'm the chief connector at leadership dots where I serve as "the string" for individuals and organizations. Like stringing pearls together to make a necklace, "being the string" is an intentional way of thinking and behaving – making linkages between things that otherwise appear random or unconnected – whether that be supervising a staff, completing a dissertation or advancing a project in the workplace. I share daily leadership dots on my blog to provide examples of “the string” in action. I use the string philosophy through coaching, consulting and teaching to help others build capacity in themselves and their organizations. I craft analogies and metaphors that help people comprehend complex topics and understand their role in the system. My favorite work involves helping those new to supervision or newly promoted supervisors build confidence and learn the skills necessary to effectively lead their team.

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