It’s a sure sign of silos when one part of a process goes live while another part is still in development. My sister in Massachusetts is waiting to file her taxes because the forms aren’t ready yet – as if it was a surprise that a new year was coming. I purchased a new car in August and received my Owner’s Manual last week because it wasn’t printed yet. On a technical assistance call today for a grant – that is due March 3 – we learned that some of the clarifying documents will be posted “soon”.

There is always a temptation to get things to the client as soon as you are able, but sharing incomplete information causes more frustration than it resolves. Take the time to “backward engineer” and plan for all the components of a project that will be needed and construct a release date accordingly. It’s not good to have supporting work-in-progress while simultaneously having the product in the user’s hands. Partially completed work is not ready to go live.

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

I'm the chief connector at leadership dots where I serve as "the string" for individuals and organizations. Like stringing pearls together to make a necklace, "being the string" is an intentional way of thinking and behaving – making linkages between things that otherwise appear random or unconnected – whether that be supervising a staff, completing a dissertation or advancing a project in the workplace. I share daily leadership dots on my blog to provide examples of “the string” in action. I use the string philosophy through coaching, consulting and teaching to help others build capacity in themselves and their organizations. I craft analogies and metaphors that help people comprehend complex topics and understand their role in the system. My favorite work involves helping those new to supervision or newly promoted supervisors build confidence and learn the skills necessary to effectively lead their team.

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