In a brilliant Pinkcast, author Dan Pink provides some of the most powerful two minutes of content that I have seen in a long while. Pink shares four questions that help people to develop the skill of intellectual humility — the willingness to accept that what you believe may be wrong. These key questions allow you to question your own cognitive blind spots in search of greater understanding.

What I liked about how Pink framed the issue was that he turned “being wrong” into a virtue instead of a failure. He gave intellectual humility a positive spin and linked it to an identity that people would want to take on for themselves.

Atomic Habits author James Clear writes that “the ultimate form of intrinsic motivation is when a habit becomes part of your identity. It’s one thing to say I’m the type of person who wants this. It’s something different to say I’m the type of person who is this.”* The Pinkcast video helps people take on the identity of being open-minded, inquisitive, and yes, sometimes wrong.

I’d suggest using this video as a quick but potent way for facilitators to begin group work or for leaders to frame discussions that could prove to be contentious. It can give your team language to aid in constructive conflict with civility – something that every organization can use more of today!

*Atomic Habits by James Clear, 2018, p. 33

 

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

I'm the chief connector at leadership dots where I serve as "the string" for individuals and organizations. Like stringing pearls together to make a necklace, "being the string" is an intentional way of thinking and behaving – making linkages between things that otherwise appear random or unconnected – whether that be supervising a staff, completing a dissertation or advancing a project in the workplace. I share daily leadership dots on my blog to provide examples of “the string” in action. I use the string philosophy through coaching, consulting and teaching to help others build capacity in themselves and their organizations. I craft analogies and metaphors that help people comprehend complex topics and understand their role in the system. My favorite work involves helping those new to supervision or newly promoted supervisors build confidence and learn the skills necessary to effectively lead their team.

2 comments

  1. Hi Beth,
    I read the dots everyday (well almost…exceptions are rare, however). Many of them I take to heart as good personal and professional advice. This one especially spoke to me personally and professionally. As is usually the case with good advice, I thought of several others who might benefit from the message. I’m passing it on to some family and friends.

    In case I haven’t mentioned it in the past, I appreciate your dedication to publishing these. It’s always good for me to start out my day with a positive word of advice from someone who makes a habit of looking at even small things in life as opportunities for lessons.

    Thanks!

    Brenda Baker
    DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & OPERATIONS
    National Association for Campus Activities
    13 Harbison Way • Columbia, SC 29212
    Direct: 803.217.3465 • Main: 803.732.6222
    naca.org

    Like

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