A friend shared this paragraph with me, and while at first glance it was startling to see, it actually proved to be easily readable.

I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmeneal pweor of the hmuan mnid. Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you cna sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istelf, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amazanig, huh? Yaeh, and I awlyas thought slpeling was ipmorantt.

When you think about it, it is pretty amazing that you can make sense of the above jumbled message. It all comes down to having the right anchor letters.

What are the anchors for your organization: the messages your employees need to make sense of everything else?  As you can see from the above paragraph, if the parameters are set clearly, there is leeway for variation in the middle. Spend the time to get the anchors right, and worry less about the details in between.

About the Author leadership dots by dr. beth triplett

Dr. beth triplett is the owner of leadership dots, offering coaching, training and consulting for new supervisors. She also shares daily lessons on her leadershipdots blog. Her work is based on the leadership dots philosophy that change happens through the intentional connecting of small steps in the short term to the big picture in the long term.

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